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Watch-a-Watt

Watch-A-Watt is an energy monitoring program that allows members to identify what appliances and electronics are using electricity in their home. Members can check-out an energy monitoring device, called a Kill A Watt, from their local library. Then it's a simple as taking it home and plugging it in to your appliances.

 

Where do I get my energy monitoring device?

Kill A Watt devices will be available February 1, 2010 at the following libraries for your convenience:

  • Ridgway Public Library - 300 Charles St., Ridgway, CO 81432; (970) 626-5252
  • Ouray Public Library - 320 6th Ave., Ouray, CO 81427; (970) 325-4616
  • Silverton Public Library - 1111 Reese, Silverton, CO 81433; (970) 387-5770
  • Wilkinson Public Library - 100 West Pacific Ave., Telluride, CO 81435; (970) 728-4519
  • Norwood Public Library - 1110 Lucerne St., Norwood, CO 81423; (970) 327-4129
  • Naturita Public Library - 411 W. 2nd Ave., Naturita, CO 81422; (970) 865-2848
  • Nucla Public Library - 544 Main St., Nucla, CO 81424; (970) 864-2166
  • Rico Public Library - 2 N. Commercial St., Rico, CO 81332; (970) 967-2103

 

How does it work?

Just plug the Kill A Watt into a wall socket, and then plug your appliance, such as a television or refrigerator, into the socket on the front of the Kill A Watt. The Kill A Watt will show you what your appliance is using in kilowatt hours, the same measurement used on your electricity bills.
To determine energy usage, press the "kwh" key -- this will give you the number of kilowatt-hours that the appliance has used since it was connected to the Kill A Watt. Press the "kwh" key a 2nd time, and the Kill A Watt will give you the number of hours over which this energy was used.

 

How long should I leave an appliance plugged in?

Leave the appliance plugged into the Kill A Watt for a day or so to get a good average reading. 

 

What does my KWH usage mean to me?

You've identified what's using energy in your home and how much, but what now? Ask yourself if you can unplug any of the items that use power even when they are turned off. After you've taken these small steps, evaluate what items were the biggest energy hogs in your home. Often times these can be old appliances like water heaters, refrigerators and washing machines. Below is a chart comparing the average annual electricity usage of baseline and EnergyStar household appliances.

Annual Electricity Usage in Kilowatt Hours

Appliance

Baseline Model Use

EnergyStar Use

Cordless Phone

29.94

17.52

Headset for cordless phone

26.61

8.76

DVD Player

46.33

32.34

Dehumidifier, small

650

596

Dehumidifier, medium

1064

851

Dehumidifier, large

1329

1287

Dishwasher, gas water heating

264

187

Dishwasher, electric water heating

467

331

Refrigerator,* manual defrost

479

407

Refrigerator,* partial auto defrost

479

407

Refrigerator,* top-mount freezer

532

452

Refrigerator,* side-mount freezer

636

541

Refrigerator*, bottom-mount freezer

579

492

Refrigerator,* top-mount freezer w/ ice dispenser

632

529

Refrigerator,* side-mount freezer w/ ice dispenser

670

570

Chest freezer, 22 cubic ft.

520

468

Ceiling fan, including lighting use**

295

143

Ceiling fan, no lights

78

71

Clothes Washer, electric water heating

820

562

Clothes Washer, gas water heating

82

56

*Refrigerator assumption was 18 cubic feet of refrigerator space and 5 cubic feet of freezer space 
**Energy star ceiling fan assumes 3 20-watt CFLs, conventional model assumes 3 60-watt incandescents 
Source: NRECA's Cooperative Research Network, E-Source

 

 

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